Join The Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement

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Courtesy of http://thewomensalzheimersmovement.org

Almost every minute Alzheimer’s disease impacts a new brain in the United States, and 2/3 of these belong to women. Women are also more likely to become a primary caregiver to someone living with Alzheimer’s.

While Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia impact everyone, women are at the center of this growing epidemic.

Maria Shriver and The Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement™ is on a mission to inform and educate women around the US and provide key research to find out why women are more likely to receive an Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

You can join the Women’s Movement in the fight.  Sign up online to show your support, see tips on how to keep your brain healthy and active, get the facts on Alzheimer’s or explore tips for caregivers.

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Experience What It Is Like To Live With Alzheimer’s

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SYNERGY HomeCare of North Atlanta would like to invite you to join us on an emotional journey to experience the realities of life for persons living with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

After experiencing this sensory tour, you will understand the overwhelming effects of the aging process when combined with dementia. This life changing experience can also help you make better care giving and health decisions by knowing what your loved one may be coping with on a daily basis.

This event takes place on Tuesday, September 12th from 10am-12 noon at:

Shallowford Presbyterian Church
2375 Shallowford Rd., Atlanta, GA 30345

There is no charge for this event and it is open to the public, but space is limited.  Reserve your spot by contacting Christine Miller with The Memory Center at (678) 607-9679 or ChristineM@thememorycenter.com.

Taking Care of Kids and Elderly Parents at the Same Time

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Taking care of your kids at home while caring for an elderly parent?  You’re a member of The Sandwich Generation, although the name sounds more appetizing than the scenario.

Adults in The Sandwich generation have children at home – or older kids maybe fresh out of the nest but still requiring support – and they also have an elderly parent who with increasing care needs. It’s a daunting and exhausting place to be – and we haven’t even mentioned the full-time workload you’re probably carrying.

We’re here to provide support.

7 Tips to Ease the Burden of Raising Kids While Caring for Elderly Parents

There is good news for The Sandwich Generation is twofold. First, you are not alone. In fact, according to the Pew Research Center nearly 50% of adults between the ages of 40 and 59 have a minor at home and/or an adult child they support AND have a parent 65+ who will require increasing levels of care. Just knowing you have a tribe out there can help.

Secondly, you are seen. Those of us who work in the world of senior and memory care witness first hand the burden placed upon you. We have many tips to help you take care of everyone in your family, without sacrificing the last vestiges of yourself, your energy levels and overall well-being.

Putting these 7 tips you can put into place can help ease the hardships placed on you and your family during this compressed period of time.

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Dining at The Memory Center, Richmond

1 – Start visiting local assisted living communities

. In the midst of crisis is one of the worst times to make big decisions. Instead, take advantage of free consultations with assisted living and memory care communities in your area. These consultations are rich with information and ideas you can put to work now while considering and developing your long-term plan. 

Visiting long term care facilities is the only way to know which one feels like the best fit for you/your parents when the time comes.  And if your parent is in the beginning stages of dementia or Alzheimer’s, these consultations give him/her some agency regarding their future – very important during a time when seniors often feel like they’re losing autonomy.

2 – Make the home safe and accessible

There are plenty of articles out there on how to remodel a home and make it accessible, but it doesn’t have to be that complicated.  With even simple changes and adjustments to your parent’s house and yard, you’ll notably decrease their risk of falling – and that decreases their risk of hospitalization or surgical interventions known to contribute to senior cognitive decline.

Some of the most easiest changes to making a senior’s home safer include installing motion-sensitive lighting, minimizing trip hazards (like exposed cords, edges of area rugs, uneven thresholds, etc.), installing handrails in toilet and bath/shower areas, building a ramp if needed, rearranging cupboards so everyday items are accessible without bending over or standing on a step stool, and providing an easier way to reach you when needed.

3 – Include your children in the process

. We often forget children are alert and aware of what’s happening in the household and to the ones they love. Even if you think you’re keeping the majority of the “heavy stuff” out of their world, they know and sense you are being stretched beyond your means.

However, even adult children don’t always know what to say or how to help. Similarly, children are just as worried and concerned about their grandparent(s) in their own way and may feel very helpless, which can cause younger children and teens to act out.

If nothing else, foster open communication in age-appropriate ways about what’s happening to grandma and/or grandpa, how you are feeling and about how difficult this situation is at times. The more open and communicative your family is, the more supportive and connected it can remain – even during the toughest moments. If they’re old enough, engage children in helping to provide care and companionship, if they’re young – find little things they can do to be useful. We recommend reading, alz.org’s, Helping Your Children or Grandchildren. The tips are universal for any family coping with dementia or Alzheimer’s – whether you’re sandwiched or not.

4 – Make taking care of yourself a priority

You know the airplane safety spiel about fastening your oxygen mask first, and then ensuring everyone around you has fastened theirs? Use it as a metaphor for your current life. If you think things are emotionally and financially challenging now, imagine what it would be like if you wound up succumbing to serious medical issues as a result of over stressed caregiver depletion. It happens all the time to primary caregivers and it leaves their loved ones in a major lurch.

Primary caregivers must make their well-being a priority so they remain healthy, balanced and as centered as possible through this phase of the journey. That means eating a well-balanced diet, finding ways to get a little exercise in (some days, that might  mean parking in the furthest spot to walk a little longer or taking the stairs instead of the elevator) and finding a way to clear 5- or 10-minutes of quiet-time amidst the busy-ness. Joining an Alzheimer’s support group can also provide a wealth of emotional support and bolstering.

5 – Take advantage of respite care options.

If your parent hasn’t relocated yet, contact local home care agencies to ask about their respite care services. Respite care providers give primary spouse and/or family caregivers the opportunity to focus on their regularly scheduled lives. In your case, this means more time to have dinner with the family, attend academic and extracurricular activities, go to bible study or religious events and to gain more quality time with the kids.

It can also serve as a baby step of sorts, a means of getting you and your parent accustomed to letting someone else help out with everything from companionship, driving and medication reminders, to meal preparation, bathing, dressing and toileting – all the things that may need to be taken over as your parent’s condition progresses.

tips for caregivers

6 – Imagine you’re meeting your parent for the first time

Whether a parent is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or dementia, suffering from the crippling grief from the loss of a spouse and/or peers, or is simply frustrated s/he can no longer do the things s/he loved – The ability to take big steps back is an amazing skill-set for children caregivers to develop.

Imagine you’re meeting your parent for the very first time. See your parent as s/he is now – while keeping your memories sacred. This will help you to find new ways to connect, explore creative ways to communicate, and establish deeper means of cultivating compassion with who they are – and what they’re capable of – in each moment.

7 – Be gentle with yourself

You’re under a tremendous pressure – not to mention emotional duress. Also, you are human. Be gentle and compassionate with yourself – and always forgive yourself in the moments you aren’t at your best.

Please visit our News Feed for more resources on Alzheimer’s and dementia care. You can also contact us to schedule a tour of The Memory Center communities in Atlanta, Richmond or Virginia Beach

 

Join Us To Walk To End Alzheimer’s

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Join The Memory Center, Atlanta and Johns Creek Hospital in the fight to end Alzheimer’s disease.

All are welcome join our team in the Walk to End Alzheimer’s on Saturday, September 16th, 2017.

On site registration begins at 8:00am and the Opening Ceremony begins at 9:00am.

3200 George Busbee Pkwy NW in Kennesaw.

To get more information and registration information contact Christine Miller with The Memory Center, Atlanta at (678) 607-9679 or email at ChristineM@thememorycenter.com.

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Download a flyer for more information.

Evening Alzheimer’s and Dementia Support Group

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Caring for a loved or family member with Alzheimer’s or dementia can be difficult.  Connecting with others in the same situation can be beneficial to learn from each other, get questions answered and find out about new resources.

The Memory Center, Atlanta is pleased to announce a new Alzheimer’s and Dementia Partner Support group coordinated by Certified Facilitator – Carol Mullen with Compassus.

This group will meet at The Memory Center, Atlanta the first Wednesday of every month from 6pm-7pm.

Everyone is welcome, and there is no charge for the event.  To reserve your spot call (678) 607-9679 or email Christine Miller at ChristineM@thememorycenter.com

Upcoming groups are scheduled:

Wednesday, September 6th at 6:00pm

Wednesday, October 4th at 6:00pm

Wednesday, November 1st at 6:00pm

The Memory Center, Atlanta is located in Johns Creek next to City Hall and Emory Hospital at 12050 Findley Road.

Memory Center, Atlanta Construction Update

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The Memory Center, Atlanta construction is nearly complete and will be opening our doors to our first residents very soon.

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The Fox Theater

 

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Cityscape

 

alzheimer's care atlanta
Town Center
memory care atlanta ga
Resident Bedroom

Contact us for a tour of The Memory Center, Atlanta behind Emory Johns Creek hospital.  Our newest community will be the most comprehensive facility specializing in the care of those living with Alzheimer’s and dementia in the Atlanta area. 

Get More Information or Schedule A Tour

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daytime Support Group For Alzheimer’s Caregivers

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dementia alzheimer's support group atlantaThe Memory Center, Atlanta is pleased to announce a new Dementia and Alzheimer’s support group facilitated by Mayme Holombe from Dynamic Hospice.

The group will meet the third Thursday of every month at 10:00am providing family members and caregivers with a place they can connect with others, ask questions and learn about resources.

Everyone is welcome, and there is no charge for the event.  To reserve your spot call (678) 456-4304 or email Christine Miller at ChristineM@thememorycenter.com

Upcoming groups are scheduled:

Thursday August 17th at 10:00am

Thursday September 21st at 10:00am

Thursday October 19th at 10:00am

The Memory Center, Atlanta is located in Johns Creek next to City Hall and Emory Hospital at 12050 Findley Road.

 

Free Estate Planning and Elder Law Seminar

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The Memory Center, Atlanta and The Parc at Duluth are pleased to offer a free seminar featuring Victoria Collier, a certified Elder Law Attorney.

She will discuss new Georgia power of attorney laws, asset protection and planning for long term care.

The event takes place Thursday August 24th at 6pm at The Parc at Duluth. 

This free event is open to the public but seating is limited. Reserve your space by contacting Christine Miller at (678) 456-4304 or ChristineM@TheMemoryCenter.com

Click for directions to The Parc at Duluth.

 

When Is The Right Time To Transition To Memory Care?

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This is a common question, and can be a hard one to answer. 

The decision to move a family member to assisted living or memory care facility like The Memory Center, Atlanta can be emotionally and physically challenging for everyone involved.  And there are many health, safety and financial concerns to consider.

Dr. Gary Figiel, a member of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, has spent over 20 years treating the geriatric population and is trained in managing memory disorders including Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

Join us for a special seminar and hear what Dr. Figiel has to say, ask questions and become more informed on this very important topic.

When:  Thursday, June 22nd from 5pm – 7pm

Where: Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Classroom A, Lower Level
6325 Hospital Parkway, Johns Creek 30097

RSVP: This is a free seminar but seating is limited.  Please RSVP to Christine Miller at (678) 456-4304 or christinem@thememorycenter.com to reserve your space.

Read More about The Memory Center, Atlanta opening soon. 

 

 

Memory Center Atlanta Sneak Peek Tours

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The Memory Center Atlanta is opening soon and we invite you to come see the new standard in Memory Care.

Our innovative community is dedicated to helping people with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia live well. 

Schedule your Sneak Peak tour today by calling 678-456-4304.

The Memory Center Atlanta
12050 Findley Rd. | Johns Creek, GA 30097
Next to the Johns Creek Hospital

Read more about The Memory Center communities and our unique approach to memory care.

LATEST NEWS


18
Sep

Join The Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement

Almost every minute Alzheimer’s disease impacts a new brain in the United States, and 2/3 of these belong to women. Women are also more likely to become a primary caregiver...

READ MORE

22
Aug

Taking Care of Kids and Elderly Parents at the Same Time

Taking care of your kids at home while caring for an elderly parent?  You’re a member of The Sandwich Generation, although the name sounds more appetizing than the scenario. Adults...

READ MORE

17
Aug

Memory Center, Atlanta Construction Update

The Memory Center, Atlanta construction is nearly complete and will be opening our doors to our first residents very soon.     Contact us for a tour of The Memory...

READ MORE

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