The Memory Center Atlanta Staff

Steven Custer, Executive Director

Steven Custer joins The Memory Center with 30 years of Operations experience. Over the last 10 years in the Healthcare and Assisted living arena. Steven began to move into the Healthcare arena after seeing a Family Member deal with Alzheimer/Dementia and eventually succumb to the disease. He personally experiences the care and dedication that was involved in caring for a loved one.  After a successful career in the housing industry and owning/selling his own business.  He decided to pursue a career with a purpose.   He started his health care with Pruitt.  He then transitioned into Independent Living, Assisted Living and Memory Care.  

Who is Steven?

Steven grew up in Northern Virginia and move south to attend school. He eventually ended up in Greenville South Carolina where he met and married his lovely wife of 24 years. His District Managers Position brought them to Atlanta and eventually settled in the Buford area.  They had three children.  Steven enjoys spending time with his family enjoying the Beach, Camping/Glamping in Mountains or Coaching his Children’s youth teams, Over the last 4 years you will find him on the weekend at cheer completions with his Youngest daughter Emma Claire because he is the “Good luck Charm”.   He also enjoys Golfing, Fly fishing and cycling whenever he has a spare moment.  During the fall you can find Steven and his family at the Clemson Football games tailgating with the rest of the family in South Carolina. 

A Message from Steven

I am excited and humbled to have the opportunity to join The Memory Center. I can remember when the community was first opened.  It is a beautiful community with a great concept.  I am always looking at the future of our senior living communities and they should be vibrant, loving, safe places to call home where each individual resident is empowered to continue their life’s purpose. I am focused on our residents and Team members. I will lead by example to ensure exceptional services to our residents and families.

 

dr amar mohan atlanta

 

Dr. Amar Mohan, Medical Director

Dr. Amar Mohan grew up in Georgia and is board certified in Internal Medicine, and Palliative Care with a special interest in geriatric medicine, dementia care and treatment, psychiatric medicine, transitional care, and holistic medicine.

 

 

 

 

Denise Moore, Admissions and Marketing Director

I have always had a passion for seniors. I started my career as a caregiver and along my 14 years of senior living experience, it has brought me to become a senior lifestyle counselor, marketing director, sales director and executive director. I have worked as a counselor for a singular senior living community for approximately 12 years and have honed my talents to where sales & counseling warms my heart. I enjoy understanding the complications, fears and apprehension that goes into selecting a community for loved ones. My knowledge and experience have taken me down this road and I continue to thrive by helping seniors and their families feel secure and confident in their choice of a community. This is exactly why I am excited to be joining The Memory Center. I believe in this community and all that it has to offer our seniors with dementia. Being one of the few communities that specifically specializes in treating this disease, exclusively, it brings comfort to help guide loved ones to a more purposeful and meaningful life.

Lori Kerr, Director Of Nursing

Hello!  My name is Lorri L. Kerr.  I was born in Lansing, Michigan on February 12, 1965.  I have three brothers and one (late) step-brother and one step step-sister, Mary.  Having three brothers (Bob, Tom, and Chuck), I had to quickly adapt to playing “kick the can after dark, cars & trucks in the sandbox, and wearing boxing gloves with numerous rounds of “pretend boxing matches”.    

I graduated from Everett High School in June 1983, with a graduating class of 560 students.  I played and enjoyed being on the volleyball team

I joined the military when I was 21 years old.  I served three years is the Army and was stationed at Ft Lewis, Washington for that entire enlistment.  I enjoyed the great Northwest and Mt Ranier.  After three years, I went home and joined the Michigan National Guard and became a sergeant as a Unit Clerk. I, then began attending college for Nursing on the GI Bill. In 2005, my National Guard unit was called for overseas duty and I spent one year in KuWait.  Or, commonly referred to as the “Sandbox”. We were originally told it would it would be Afghanistan.  We felt so fortunate that our final Orders stated, “KuWait”.  I was assigned to work at the Troop Clinic.  After returning home, I have officially retired from the military.

I was married 10 years and have one son, Phillip Wesley Stephens.

I moved to Georgia in June 2010 from Lansing, Michigan.  Now, I feel like I have two places to call “home”—Michigan and Georgia.

I graduated from Nursing school in 2001, and have worked both in skilled nursing and assisted living. The majority of my last ten years has been in assisted living.  However, recently have worked in a Covid unit.

Currently, I live in Oakwood, Georgia.  I live close to my 78-year-old Mom and step-father, brother, son, and a cousin.  Loving the Georgia weather…!

I am excited to join The Memory Center of Johns Creek and looking forward to a wonderful partnership—TOGETHER!  ☺

 

Katherine Wurmb, Activity Director

Hello, my name is Katherine and I was born and raised in Westminster, Maryland.   After high school I attended Elon University in North Carolina and graduated in 1983 with a Bachelors of Science.  My husband Steve and I relocated from Missouri to Georgia this past fall along with our dog Sadie. 

I have worked with the senior population most of my working career and have alway been drawn to seeking out their wisdom, humor and kindness.  I have worked both as an Activity Assistant and Activity Director for over seven years in the skilled, long-term care and memory care environment.  I strive to create programs that provide our seniors with a sense of self-awareness, esteem and success. I look forward to being part of The Memory Center team and getting to know each of you.

 

Edward Kraitman, Chef

My name is Edward Kraitman. I am from Moldova and I have lived in the United States for over twenty years now, and worked as a culinary artist for over 30 years. I have a deep passion for creating food and serving it to people in ways that they enjoy. I focus on health in every meal and keep fried food off of my menu. There are no mistakes when creating a new dish and I love to experiment with every holiday. I love serving my residents and seeing their faces light up when their food arrives. I am happy when my residents are happy and always keep each individual’s needs in mind because each limitation is a new challenge that I am excited to tackle in the kitchen.

 

 

 

Staff

BethBeth Ludeke, Executive Director

Beth Ludeke has worked in the senior care industry for many years. She has experience in all aspects of senior living. Beth started out as a C.N.A., Went to nursing school and became a LPN, then moved up the ranks to become an Executive Director. Beth has devoted her career to ensuring seniors are cared for with love and respect and treated like family. Beth has two daughters and 3 grandchildren that keep her busy in her spare time.

 

Dr. Jim Wright, MD, PhD, MATS, Medical Director

Jim Wright, MD, PhD, MATS is a physician whose medical practice is focused solely on long term care, assisted living and skilled nursing facilities. He is medical director of Lexington Court Health and Rehab Center in Richmond and The Memory Center Assisted Living in Midlothian, VA. He received his MD and PhD from VCU School of Medicine in 1995 and completed a residency in Family Practice in 1998.

He holds a Masters of Arts in Theological Studies from Union Presbyterian Seminary and a Certificate in Bioethics from Loyola University, Chicago. Prior to joining Legacy Care, he was an Associate Professor of Medicine with VCU Geriatrics. He writes and speaks on the intersection of religion, ethics and medicine and is published in a number of peer reviewed journals including the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society and the Journal of Religion and Health.

 

Daphne Marshall, Admissions and Marketing Director

Daphne stands at the forefront of the fastest growing industry. She has spent the last 20 years of dedicated service to seniors. Her distinguished career includes, Operational as well as Sales and Marketing leading roles. Daphne is a powerful business driver whose clarity and vision have carried multiple communities through rapid and continuous growth. “Change is the only constant” We never accept, “We have always done it that way”!

Embracing core values of integrity, certainty and compassion, Daphne consistently ranks as top sales leader and achieves outstanding personal and team results. Daphne has a proven ability to foster relationships that lead to long term solutions and success. Her greatest motivation is to coach others to go above and beyond the expectation.

Daphne has served as President of the Healthcare Resource Network, a focus group providing community outreach. Her passion in life is to provide exceptional professional service, absolute confidentiality, and the most ethical values. If you ask her what her greatest accomplishment would be, it is that of her two grown sons and fulfilling the calling of being a mother. The journey of motherhood has made her see how strong she really is, working each day to be the Mom she wants them to remember! Profoundly driven and a perfectionist by nature.

Daphne exhibits an untiring commitment to bring better understanding to the families and seniors she serves.

 

Morgan Bond, Activities Director

Morgan Bond is from Chesapeake, Virginia, she now resides in Richmond. Morgan is a graduate of Old Dominion University with a Bachelor’s degree in Therapuetic Recreation. Morgan has completed various Therapeutic Recreation Interships, VCU Adult Psychiatric Unit Before/Aftercare leader with children, an Instructional Assistant at a Chidren’s Psychiatric hospital, a Direct Support Professional with adults with intellectual disabilites, and an Activites Assistant at an Assited Living.

Morgan truly has a passion for caring for others and bringing a smile to everyone’s face. In Morgan’s spare time she enjoys shopping and being with family and friends.

 

the memory center midlothian vaPaul Marschalco, Chef

Paul’s passion for cooking started at an early age and he enjoys culinary creations of all types. His specialty is based on family recipes from Eastern Europe and Middle Eastern cuisine.

Prior to joining the Richmond team, he served as a chef for the University of Richmond culinary team which is ranked in the top twenty university dining services in the nation. Also he worked in an assisted living community where he specialized in offering meals to meet the dietary needs of its aging senior population. Paul brings his culinary skills to The Memory Center to create wholesome meals that make our cherished residents feel like they are truly at home and cared about.

He lives in Midlothian with his family and three daughters.

 

reggie long maintenance directorReggie Long – Maintenance Director

Reggie started his career in the Navy serving for 8 years. He then transitioned into hotel management working as a manager at the Sheraton Hotel in Richmond, VA. Reggie began work with The Memory Center part time and quickly turned full time as our Maintenance and Housekeeping Director. He enjoys interacting with the residents including leading our wood work program. In his free time, Reggie is a basketball coach for his son’s team and the Athletic Director for the Chesterfield Basketball League. He has three children ages 16, 8 and 5.

17 Questions to Ask Memory Care Facilities When Touring

When you are making a decision like this man and woman sitting on a couch, evaluating options, determine the questions to ask memory care facilities.Sometimes you have to turn the tables, shift your perspective and look at things from a different angle in order to find the right answer. This is certainly the case when it’s time to search for the right type of memory care for yourself – or a loved one.

Life changes drastically when it’s time to plan for memory care. Remember: while this may feel like a sacrifice of autonomy and “normal” life, the right memory care community reclaims these things in a new way.

Click here to access the checklist now

Asking the Right Questions Leads to the Right Memory Care Community

Taking a gently assertive role as you interview (yes, interview!) prospective memory care communities via their director(s) and staff, you will know when you find “the one” for you.

You decide where – and by whom – loved ones will be cared for as their Alzheimer’s or dementia progresses. You’ll need to develop sharp “interviewing skills” as you learn which memory care communities or centers meet the essential criteria you require.

The following questions align with The Joint Commission’s Memory Care Requirements. Have these comprehensive guidelines on-hand as you move forward in the decision-making process – and you are encouraged to add your own questions.

With the director’s/staff permission, it is a good idea to record these “interview/introductory” meetings. That way, you can be fully present, knowing you can play the recording back later on.

After visiting the centers on your list, you can compare their care plans and care options, eliminating some and bumping others to the top of the list, narrowing in on your final choice.

Questions Regarding Memory Care Staffing

Do you have a Medical Director on staff?

Among the questions to ask memory care facilities, ask about the staffing. A smiling female medical staff member in scrubs.

Who’s at the helm, so to speak, when it comes to steering the physical and emotional well-being of the residents?

A community that is dedicated to serving the physical, mental, and emotional health of their residents will have the appropriate leadership to do so. Verify that they have a Medical Director on staff.

Are there RNs or LPNs on staff? If so, how many? Are they on-site 24/7?

Most high-quality memory care centers have RNs and/or LPNs on staff. They oversee any physical and/or medical needs that may arise in the course of a day. At these centers, skilled nursing staff report directly to the community’s lead physicians as needed.

Consistent staff assignments (the same caregivers caring for the same patients) build meaningful connections that foster personalized care services. Ideally, trained medical staff are available 24/7.

What medical services are available?

The bulk of the residents’ medical needs can be diagnosed/treated with on-site medical services, including:

  • Labs
  • X-Rays
  • PT/OT/SP Therapy
  • Home Health
  • Hospice
  • Podiatry
  • Pharmacy

Not only does this expedite care, it eliminates confusion associated with resident location changes and non-routine appointments.

What types of training does the staff have? 

All members of the caregiving staff should maintain ongoing, annual training in alignment with current best-practices for memory care. Participation in professional education/training should be documented.

What are staffing ratios for each shift?

The lower the ratio of staff:resident, the better a memory care facility can promote resident safety and well-being. Optimally, you’re looking for a 1:6 resident to staff ratio (or better).

However, according to payingforseniorcare.com, “…time and time again, relevant research has shown that assisted living communities with full-time RNs and direct care with in-house nursing staff have a direct impact on resident outcomes.”

Questions Regarding Memory Care Policies & Fees

  • Can my loved one stay here through the end of life or do they have to move if their care becomes too extensive?
  • What types of care can your community NOT provide?
  • What is the policy for a medical emergency/ER visit?
  • Does a staff member go with the resident on ER visits?
  • What is the policy for notifying family members?
  • What is the discharge policy?
  • Is the community all-inclusive or are there additional costs (i.e., cable TV, phone, medication fees, levels of care costs, activities/outings, transportation)?
  • Can my loved one return to the facility should they require outside rehab?
  • What happens if my loved one is no longer ambulatory?

Questions Regarding Amenities and Outings

Great memory care communities are unmistakable – they are vibrant places. These communities offer residents top-notch special memory care while they create new, colorful and creative lives.

A smiling elderly woman in a wheelchair looks up and takes the hand of another woman, while a smiling memory care facility caregiver looks on.

This means senior living at its best: attractive grounds, community gardens, recreation, and creative opportunities as well as safely organized outside trips.

Questions worth asking include:

  • What are the daily activities like, and are they every day of the week?
  • Do you charge for outside activities (for example: lunch outings, museums, etc.)?
  • Do you have Semi-Private and Private rooms? If cost is of concern, semi-private rooms can save residents thousands of dollars per year.

Ultimately, memory care communities should provide a rich spectrum of daily activities – offered in the morning, afternoon and evening. This ensures your loved one has access to fun, interesting and stimulating activities regardless of when his/her “best hours of the day” may be.

These activities should include a range of interests, hobbies and preferred modalities. Things like art, poetry, music, dancing, games, supervised cooking, sports and exercise, and social activities should all be on the menu.

All of these types of activities have been proven to slow the progression of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease and enhance the mood of those who suffer from cognitive decline.

But don’t forget the most important question of all…

Which memory care community makes you feel the most safe, comfortable and secure?

Be attentive to your intuition. As you tour prospective communities, the answers to your questions are important, but so are your instincts. With that in mind, feel free to use our checklist, with all the questions you read here:

 

Click here to access the checklist now

Keeping Your Loved One With Dementia At Home: Is It The Best Option?

Deciding when to move a loved one from home-based care to a memory care center is a difficult topic. In most cases, spouses and families opt to wait until their loved one is in the middle- to later-stages of memory care in order to keep them at home – in a familiar space – as long as possible.

While these intentions are sound, the reality is that those with dementia and Alzheimer’s seem to experience longer, higher-quality lives when they are moved to a memory care center sooner rather than later.

Moving Into Memory Care Sooner Offers Higher Quality of Living

Here are some of the reasons quality of life is improved when spouses, parents, or loved ones move into a memory care center rather than remaining at home.

Keep ahead of the memory decline curve

A succinct post on alzheimers.net describes how Alzheimer’s evolves from preclinical Alzheimer’s (the first symptoms) to the late stages of severe cognitive decline. 

By moving a loved one into memory care center ahead of the “moderate decline” point on the curve, you improve the quality of your loved one’s life because:

  • Residents have the ability to settle in, learn their way around and become familiar with the staff, their neighbors and medical professionals while they still have cognitive function.
  • 100% of their daily life is geared toward memory care specific-diets, activities, routines, outings, etc., which keeps them active and engaged.
  • They are closely monitored by experienced clinical and medical staff who can notice and address any shifts, declines, or behaviors that are immediately improved via changes in medication, treatments, or therapies.

Research continues to show that while dementia isn’t reversible in most cases, dementia-specific care and attention notably slows its progression. And, the health professionals working at memory care centers are always at the forefront of the latest memory care research and treatment options.

Continuous social engagement

In most cases, pre-dementia life involves far more personal and social engagement, along with mental stimulation, than the post-dementia diagnosis lifestyle. 

This is especially true if the person is taken care of at home. The comfort of home and increasing care from immediate family members and caregivers is valuable, but it almost inevitably leads to an individual who spends most of his/her time sitting or lying down, not very engaged with those around them, rapidly turning inward on themselves.

While the initial transition may be emotionally difficult, it’s amazing to see how those with earlier stages of dementia and Alzheimer’s blossom when they move into their new memory care environment. 

For one thing, there is no reason to maintain a pretense of “normalcy” – which is incredibly taxing for those who remain among their cognitively healthy family and friends. That “acting to keep it together” becomes a great strain.

Instead, the barriers can go down, the unknown can be explored and embraced with others in the same situation, and there is a whole new world of activities that are all geared for their wellbeing. 

Also, due to innovations such as Town Center concepts and village-like designs, memory care residents’ world becomes more vibrant (and manageable) as a result of their new environment.

Extended life expectancy and quality of life

Those who work in the very special realm of memory care know that residents who move here earlier get more comfortable and assimilate more quickly into their new life. They are more social and active, participate more willingly in the spectrum of amenities and activities offered at The Memory Center. 

As a result, those who move here during the earlier- to early-mid stages of Alzheimer’s or dementia live an average of two years longer than their counterparts.

On the other hand, individuals who move here during the later stages of the disease have the same life expectancy of those who move into more traditional nursing homes – somewhere around six months on average – because they simply don’t have the ability to enjoy all of the resources a memory care center offers them.

Ask yourself who you are protecting or taking care of

In the deep and heartfelt conversations, we have the honor and privilege to facilitate with our residents’ families, we often witness a spouse or child caregiver come to a painful awareness.

This wrenching revelation is that they waited so long to transition their beloved mate or family member into memory care because they, themselves, were having a difficult time accepting the new reality.

In many cases, the individual with dementia or Alzheimer’s asked to move or encouraged their caregivers to let them move somewhere else, but guilt or a feeling of resistance held their caregiver back. You may feel like moving them somewhere is a surrender of your obligation when, in fact, it allows you to reclaim a more loving, connected relationship.

Is there any chance your resistance has more to do with a personal desire to “keep things as they are?”. Is your fear that memory care isn’t affordable a means of shielding yourself from the reality of the situation and what’s best for the one you love and hate to see go? 

If so, we recommend taking advantage of one or more of the amazing outlets for Alzheimer’s support here in our area to help you work through your feelings.

If finances are a concern, read, How to Find Affordable Memory Care & Assisted Living, to see if there are any avenues or resources you’ve yet to tap.

Ensuring A Smooth Transition Into Memory Care

We assure you that transitioning a loved one into the right memory care facility will enhance everyone’s life – freeing up time and space to explore the new relationship that must be forged with a dementia diagnosis, as well as your new paths forward.

There is always time required to form a new plan after receiving dementia or Alzheimer’s diagnosis. However, research shows that the sooner memory care and treatment are available, the better it is for most individuals with dementia or Alzheimer’s.

Learn more from these helpful resources: 

How To Find Affordable Memory Care & Assisted Living

The first priority in locating quality memory care or assisted living options is finding a place that you trust and that is known for its high-quality care.

The second priority is finding a place you can afford.

Factors To Evaluate When Searching For Affordable Memory Care

It’s important to perform thorough due-diligence when comparing the costs of various memory care and assisted living facilities.

Unfortunately, many facilities hide “extra costs” when advertising their per/month rates, and that can become detrimental if your loved one has moved in and you find the monthly charge is notably more than you estimated.

Moving into an assisted living facility can be hard, and it can be even more so if you have to move your loved one to yet another facility as the result of hidden fees or unexpected costs.

Similarly, the very act of terminating the contract at one facility and establishing a new one can cost you thousands of wasted dollars. This is because, in addition to losing the remaining balance on the existing contract, odds are you’ll have another deposit and other associated fees attached to the new contract.

Identifying affordable assisted living or memory care options doesn’t have to be challenging. If numbers and details aren’t your forte, enlist the help of a family member, friend or your accountant to review paperwork with you and make sure you aren’t missing anything before making your final choice.

Ultimately, you want to choose a place that has the highest-quality care, meals, amenities and activities for the most affordable price.

Comparing Advertised Cost & Hidden Costs

One of the most important things to keep in mind when searching for affordable assisted living or memory care is the discrepancy between the “advertised cost” and the “hidden costs.”

When you’re making such an important choice, you need all of the facts at hand to make a well-informed decision, and this includes a complete and detailed list of all costs – not just the basic “room and board” fees.

Common Fees Included (but not always)

Here are some of the most common fees included in a general price estimate. Keep in mind that every facility is different, so you’ll want to confirm specific costs with each prospective facility you visit.

  • Rent
  • Meals
  • Housekeeping
  • Access to general exercise and activities

Those are just the basics, and you may be surprised to find that other services you “assumed” were included (often the services the facility promotes during your tour and visits) cost extra.

Ask About Hidden Fees

Some of the hidden fees that might surprise you include:

  • Certain occupational or physical therapies prescribed by medical staff
  • Periodic “assessment fees,” similar to HOA dues, that are bumped up over time
  • Hygiene costs, including dressing, bathing, incontinence care, and laundry
  • Medication management and medication distribution
  • The initial (and possibly subsequent) health screenings
  • On-site physician and pharmacy access
  • Treatment for temporary wounds, illnesses or injuries
  • General wellness monitoring, such as blood pressure or blood sugar levels
  • Escorts to activities or dining center(s)
  • Periodic wellness check-ins
  • Transportation to various events, outings, or off-site appointments
  • Extra fees for deep-cleaning of the bathroom or other areas
  • Moving costs
  • Telephone charges
  • Fees/charges for contracted- or atypical special events, classes or activities

While charging extra for non-contracted services and extras isn’t unethical, it’s imperative that you know exactly what is included – and what is not – so you can plan accordingly.

For example, your preferred memory care center may charge extra for off-site transportation, and that’s fine. By knowing that, you can get your preferences in writing, stating that your spouse or loved one is only budgeted to go on inclusive outings OR a stated number of charged outings per month.

Are Special Amenities & Services Worth The Extra Money?

When you’re touring various facilities, take a good, analytical look at their amenities, classes, and services. You may be surprised when you factor in your total budget and find that spending slightly more per month for a memory care center with superior amenities is well-worth it.

For one thing, you and your family members will save money each week if you’re able to join your spouse, parent or grandparent at the in-house Pub or Cafe, or to catch a movie at the on-site theater.

The water exercise, aerobics, yoga or dance classes offered as part of an all-inclusive assisted living facility may be more affordable than the gym membership and other extracurricular dues and fees your loved one insisted in keeping up, even after s/he couldn’t attend anymore.

Does All-Inclusive Affordable Memory Care Mean All-Inclusive?

When you keep the above “hidden charges” potential in mind, all-inclusive memory care centers begin to look more affordable. What used to seem like a notably higher per/month charge now starts to become more reasonable.

For example, The Memory Care Center is considered an all-inclusive community. We provide a detailed and itemized list of costs to any prospective and current residents and their families as requested.

Among the basic services, our monthly fees include services such as dressing/grooming and toileting, regular laundry and linen services, items “purchased” from visits to our General Store and any outings offered by our Activities Program and more.

Even so, there are a few things that aren’t included in that “all-inclusive” price.

For example, we charge residents for certain services or items such as:

  • Long-distance telephone calls
  • Incontinence supplies
  • Salon services
  • Transportation to off-site appointments

However, we are always happy to pre-arrange a budget or restrictions based on your wishes.

So, for example, if your mother enjoys her monthly salon appointment, we’ll keep that to once per month and gently remind her of her “upcoming appointment” if she tries to book an extra appointment. Honesty and clarity around charges are essential to making the right decision for your loved one.

Finding Affordable Memory Care & Assisted Living

Ultimately, your prospective memory care and assisted living facilities’ transparency around pricing is indicative of their ethics, integrity and the sincerity of their work.

Sometimes, paying a bit more each month – and knowing that’s all you’ll have to pay – is well worth peace of mind.

Learn about pricing

What Makes The Memory Center Different?

What Makes The Memory Center Different?

Choosing the right memory care community is essential to your loved one’s well-being, as well as the well-being of your family.

You want to select a place that is as dedicated to your loved one’s mental and physical well-being, as much as to their emotional comfort and security. This is where The Memory Center excels.

We also recommend reading, How to Compare Assisted Living Communities, which outlines features, benefits and care specific to memory care.

Memory Care Dedicated to Physical, Mental and Emotional Well-Being of Residents

The Memory Center is primarily established to support the physical health of our residents, emphasizing the most current and relevant science around Alzheimer’s and other dementia-related conditions. However, we also know 100% that our residents fare best when their environment is conducive to a life well-lived.

To that end, our memory care center differs from many of the surrounding options, particularly in regards to the following six features:

1. On-site medical director visits

As you know, transitions become increasingly difficult for those with Alzheimer’s and dementia. At the same time, those with dementia often have existing medical conditions or may develop other age-related conditions during their time here.

As a result, we have an on-site medical director who is available on a daily basis to confer with our staff nurses (who are on-site 24-hours a day) to address any issues that arise.

Our medical director is a fellowship-trained geriatrician who, in addition to being available to our nurses, also schedules assessments with each of our patients on a weekly basis.

The medical director coordinates home health services for physical, occupational, speech, and psychiatric therapies as needed, ensuring our patients rarely need to leave the premises for routine appointments and specialist visits.

Whether you choose one of our Memory Care Centers or not, we highly recommend narrowing your memory care choices to those with on-site medical staff to reduce the number of off-site appointments or lab work that can agitate residents and cause unnecessary stress.

what makes the memory center different2. Normalcy in a safe, secure environment

Routine and normalcy is a key component in mitigating the side effects of dementia-related conditions, and it is also shown to slow down their progression. This is why The Memory Center establishes normal, safe, and reliable daily rhythms.  

Our center is designed to be attractive and includes the comforts of home and community, all within an extremely safe and secure environment. Our center was built with complete respect for the primary environmental objectives recommended by The Alzheimer’s Association.

We’ve gone above and beyond to include a town-center concept with safe and highly-secure outdoor areas, including courtyards and walking paths.

3. Individualized care and programming

Sure, there are multiple similarities in terms of how dementia and Alzheimer’s show up, and what that means for those who are diagnosed. That being said, we also recognize that each of our residents is a unique individual,so we provide tailored care for each and every one.

This includes things like:

  • Specialized meal plans. All of the foods and treats available via our cafeteria, meal plans and the town center’s cafes and pub are made with respect to a healthy diet. We can create meal plans specific to a resident’s existing medical restrictions and/or sensitivities.
  • Individual health care plans. As mentioned above, our dedicated on-site medical director, nurses and care providers are well-versed on each of our resident’s specific care plans and needs.
  • Social events and programming. Our diverse array of classes, entertainment, social offerings, and classes are so compelling that we often hear quips from residents’ family and friends that they are ready to move in. These events are key to honoring the individual and creating a healthy, stimulating, and social environment that engages residents on a daily basis.

4. The inclusion of residents in every aspect of the day

While we do respect a resident’s choice to spend a day to themselves once in a while, we also provide the opportunity to participate in every aspect of the day. This is done via routine check-ins, conversations, and walks with staff.

Our activities and entertainment coordinators thoughtfully create the weekly and monthly itineraries in a way that allows every resident to participate in the activities they enjoy on a regular basis.

5. Programs designed for those with dementia are not restricted in any way

Often, well-meaning assisted living facilities offer programs designed for those with dementia but then simplify them unnecessarily. This results in classes that are better suited for young children, rather than independent adults.

At The Memory Care Centers, we do prioritize programs that are both beneficial for those with dementia and to complement our residents’ innate talents and interests, but they are not simplified.

Teachers, instructors, and presenters put together engaging, stimulating, and even challenging curricula and only amend these if a resident needs it, or to accommodate an existing disability. This enables our residents to embrace their interests and enjoy their faculties to the absolute fullest.

6. Carefully thought out design to trigger reminiscing and participation

Humans are social creatures, so social bonds, daily interaction and human-to-human connections are key to a lively, active and engaged mind and body.

To this effort, every aspect of the outdoor and interior designs are dedicated to triggering reminiscences, participation, and socialization.

This includes things such as:

  • Warm colors and comfortable, homey furnishings
  • Classic interior designs that are contemporary but include historical and traditional architectural accents
  • Ample daylighting and lighting plans that encourage a healthy circadian rhythm
  • Communal areas and gathering spaces
  • Delicious food options
  • Our incredible Town Center concept
  • Plenty of beautiful outdoor spaces to enjoy Mother Nature

Innovative Memory Care Differentiators

Our intentional respect to these six memory care differentiators make The Memory Center unique amongst the area’s memory care and assisted living facility options.

Learn more

 

Atlanta Resource Guide For Alzheimer’s Care And Support

An Alzheimer’s or dementia diagnosis is life changing, and it is also a call-to-action.

The sooner you can breathe through the initial shock and adjustment period, the better able you’ll be to create a long-term care plan that involves the input, opinions, and preferences of your loved one.

Quick action also optimizes the time available to research and learn more about the Alzheimer’s journey before it progresses to mid- or later-stages.

This gives you a more spacious ability to explore local options for the following:

  • Adult day care
  • Home care
  • Memory care

It also enables you to thoughtfully develop and assemble a financial plan that supports your loved one’s long-term care goals.

Top Online Resources to Learn About Alzheimer’s and Alzheimer’s Care

There is only so much you can take in at a doctor’s appointment, especially in the wake of a confirmed Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

The odds are that in addition to visiting your general practitioner, you’ll be referred to a neurologist.

Hopefully, your healthcare team will provide plenty of information about Alzheimer’s via pamphlets, and allow ample time for your questions and answers. We recommend recording appointments (with the doctor’s permission), so you can listen back afterward.

There are a wide range of reputable, online resources for learning about Alzheimer’s disease, keeping up on the latest research regarding medications and/or lifestyle changes that slow its progression, as well as information about the type of long-term care that’s most successful for those with mid- to late-stages of Alzheimer’s and dementia.

The following are the most well-respected and current websites available.

The National Institute of Aging Alzheimer’s Page

The US Department of Health and Human Services underwrites an organization called the National Institute of Health (NIH). Under this umbrella also lives the National Institute on Aging (NIA), which hosts an Alzheimer’s Disease page.

This is a solid place to start when you want to learn everything you can about Alzheimer’s, including general descriptions of the disease, information about caregiving needs and options as well as up-to-date facts about current Alzheimer’s research.

Another exciting thing about the NIA’s page is that it provides information about upcoming and existing clinical trials in which consenting adults can participate.

Additionally, there is a wealth of educational resources about diet and lifestyle changes that help to prevent Alzheimer’s, slow down its progression and to improve the outcome for those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

The Alzheimer’s Association

The Alzheimer’s Association is a leading voluntary health association dedicated to supporting Alzheimer’s research, providing information about Alzheimer’s and memory care, and connecting others with Alzheimer’s support in the Atlanta area and online.

The Alzheimer’s Association was founded more than 30 years ago when a group of families and caregivers joined together to create an organization that would unite caregivers, provide support to those facing Alzheimer’s and advance research into the disease.

Today, the AA has connected with and provided support to millions of people affected by an Alzheimer’s diagnosis and their website continues to be a premier resource for all aspects of Alzheimer’s information.

Alzheimer’s Foundation of America

Similar to the Alzheimer’s Association, the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) was founded by individuals who are personally affected by Alzheimer’s.

One of their most helpful resources is a national toll-free hotline, (866-232-8484), that is staffed entirely by licensed clinical social workers specializing in Alzheimer’s care, treatment and support.

Like other non-profits, the AFA funds research and does everything possible to provide caregiver support and educate the public about Alzheimer’s, including information about confidential memory screening services available in Atlanta and elsewhere. Memory screenings are funded by generous donors and grantors and have been used to screen more than four million people nationwide.

Alzheimer’s Support From Family & Friends

An Alzheimer’s diagnosis spreads ripples far beyond the lives of the patient, most powerfully impacting their spouse, immediate family and the next ring of family members and close friends.

Having conversations with these individuals early establishes your first rungs of support. Often, individuals are reticent to share this information and may want to keep it a secret out of fear, feelings of embarrassment and shame, etc.

While a short period of private adjustment is understandable, the sooner you feel comfortable having deep conversations with family and close friends, the better you’ll navigate a long-term care plan that makes sense for you and loved ones.

Read, Guide for Talking to a Loved One About Memory Care, which also outlines how to bring close friends and family into the conversation.

Learn About Memory Care Options

One of the first items of business is creating a memory care plan; again, this is one of the reasons early action is so critical.

While it’s true people with early stages of Alzheimer’s can do fine for a bit by implementing in-home caregiving support, it’s also true that caregiving becomes quickly overwhelming for spouse caregivers. Thus, it makes sense to learn all you can about the full spectrum of options to add to your Alzheimer’s support and care kit.

In almost all cases, those with Alzheimer’s fare best when they move to memory care communities earlier, rather than later, so individuals have time to feel at home and adjust to their new environment while they are still able to make decisions and be more fully present in their day-to-day lives.

Once mid- to late-stage Alzheimer’s sets in, significant transitions are highly stressful for both patient and spouse. And, sadly, in the attempt to “preserve the status-quo” for as long as possible, the resulting stress and strain of the move can exacerbate their symptoms.

Respite Care

In the beginning, while your loved one lives at home, you’ll need respite care. This invaluable service provides a break for primary caregivers.

While respite care can be brought in, or offered by a local senior center, we recommend using respite care options offered by the assisted living or memory care centers you’re currently researching. It’s an opportunity to familiarize yourself with their grounds, services, programs, and staff and ask important questions to learn more about the community.

Assisted Living Options

Until recently, those with later-stage Alzheimer’s moved into assisted living and/or nursing home facilities. These are still options, but we recommend only considering facilities offering dedicated memory care services since the needs and care required for those with Alzheimer’s are different from that of the general assisted living population.

Read, How to Compare Assisted Living Facilities, for more information.

Memory Care Centers

Dedicated Memory Care Centers are the best way to ensure patients live in supportive, stimulating and caring environments specifically designed and dedicated to those with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

In addition to exemplary, round-the-clock care, high-quality memory care centers have on-site doctors, nurses, dental care, pharmacies, etc., to ease the transition for residents who are ill or require routine, managed care for existing medical conditions.

Similarly, things like Town Center models, art and music facilities, classes and other amenities provide a sense of “normal life” and make it a pleasure for spouses, friends and family members to visit.

Ultimately, memory care centers adhere to the Alzheimer Association Dementia Care Practice Recommendations, focused on tenets like person-centered care, on-site medical staff and supportive and therapeutic environments. All are proven to improve the quality of life for those with Alzheimer’s and dementia.

Alzheimer’s Care And Support in Atlanta

Challenging conditions of an aging brain should be met with a supportive well-rounded community carefully planned for the individual.

This not only includes access to all of the necessary resources for a high quality of life today but one that can adapt to who they are tomorrow.

Learn more about memory care in Atlanta

Atlanta Resource Guide for Alzheimer’s Care & Support

An Alzheimer’s or dementia diagnosis is life changing, and it is also a call-to-action.

The sooner you can breathe through the initial shock and adjustment period, the better able you’ll be to create a long-term care plan that involves the input, opinions, and preferences of your loved one.

Quick action also optimizes the time available to research and learn more about the Alzheimer’s journey before it progresses to mid- or later-stages.

This gives you a more spacious ability to explore local options for the following:

  • Adult day care
  • Home care
  • Memory care

It also enables you to thoughtfully develop and assemble a financial plan that supports your loved one’s long-term care goals.

Top Online Resources to Learn About Alzheimer’s and Alzheimer’s Care

There is only so much you can take in at a doctor’s appointment, especially in the wake of a confirmed Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

The odds are that in addition to visiting your general practitioner, you’ll be referred to a neurologist.

Hopefully, your healthcare team will provide plenty of information about Alzheimer’s via pamphlets, and allow ample time for your questions and answers. We recommend recording appointments (with the doctor’s permission), so you can listen back afterward.

There are a wide range of reputable, online resources for learning about Alzheimer’s disease, keeping up on the latest research regarding medications and/or lifestyle changes that slow its progression, as well as information about the type of long-term care that’s most successful for those with mid- to late-stages of Alzheimer’s and dementia.

The following are the most well-respected and current websites available.

The National Institute of Aging Alzheimer’s Page

The US Department of Health and Human Services underwrites an organization called the National Institute of Health (NIH). Under this umbrella also lives the National Institute on Aging (NIA), which hosts an Alzheimer’s Disease page.

This is a solid place to start when you want to learn everything you can about Alzheimer’s, including general descriptions of the disease, information about caregiving needs and options as well as up-to-date facts about current Alzheimer’s research.

Another exciting thing about the NIA’s page is that it provides information about upcoming and existing clinical trials in which consenting adults can participate.

Additionally, there is a wealth of educational resources about diet and lifestyle changes that help to prevent Alzheimer’s, slow down its progression and to improve the outcome for those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

The Alzheimer’s Association

The Alzheimer’s Association is a leading voluntary health association dedicated to supporting Alzheimer’s research, providing information about Alzheimer’s and memory care, and connecting others with Alzheimer’s support in the Atlanta area and online.

The Alzheimer’s Association was founded more than 30 years ago when a group of families and caregivers joined together to create an organization that would unite caregivers, provide support to those facing Alzheimer’s and advance research into the disease.

Today, the AA has connected with and provided support to millions of people affected by an Alzheimer’s diagnosis and their website continues to be a premier resource for all aspects of Alzheimer’s information.

Alzheimer’s Foundation of America

Similar to the Alzheimer’s Association, the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) was founded by individuals who are personally affected by Alzheimer’s.

One of their most helpful resources is a national toll-free hotline, (866-232-8484), that is staffed entirely by licensed clinical social workers specializing in Alzheimer’s care, treatment and support.

Like other non-profits, the AFA funds research and does everything possible to provide caregiver support and educate the public about Alzheimer’s, including information about confidential memory screening services available in Atlanta and elsewhere. Memory screenings are funded by generous donors and grantors and have been used to screen more than four million people nationwide.

Alzheimer’s Support From Family & Friends

An Alzheimer’s diagnosis spreads ripples far beyond the lives of the patient, most powerfully impacting their spouse, immediate family and the next ring of family members and close friends.

Having conversations with these individuals early establishes your first rungs of support. Often, individuals are reticent to share this information and may want to keep it a secret out of fear, feelings of embarrassment and shame, etc.

While a short period of private adjustment is understandable, the sooner you feel comfortable having deep conversations with family and close friends, the better you’ll navigate a long-term care plan that makes sense for you and loved ones.

Read, Guide for Talking to a Loved One About Memory Care, which also outlines how to bring close friends and family into the conversation.

Learn About Memory Care Options

One of the first items of business is creating a memory care plan; again, this is one of the reasons early action is so critical.

While it’s true people with early stages of Alzheimer’s can do fine for a bit by implementing in-home caregiving support, it’s also true that caregiving becomes quickly overwhelming for spouse caregivers. Thus, it makes sense to learn all you can about the full spectrum of options to add to your Alzheimer’s support and care kit.

In almost all cases, those with Alzheimer’s fare best when they move to memory care communities earlier, rather than later, so individuals have time to feel at home and adjust to their new environment while they are still able to make decisions and be more fully present in their day-to-day lives.

Once mid- to late-stage Alzheimer’s sets in, significant transitions are highly stressful for both patient and spouse. And, sadly, in the attempt to “preserve the status-quo” for as long as possible, the resulting stress and strain of the move can exacerbate their symptoms.

Respite Care

In the beginning, while your loved one lives at home, you’ll need respite care. This invaluable service provides a break for primary caregivers.

While respite care can be brought in, or offered by a local senior center, we recommend using respite care options offered by the assisted living or memory care centers you’re currently researching. It’s an opportunity to familiarize yourself with their grounds, services, programs, and staff and ask important questions to learn more about the community.

Assisted Living Options

Until recently, those with later-stage Alzheimer’s moved into assisted living and/or nursing home facilities. These are still options, but we recommend only considering facilities offering dedicated memory care services since the needs and care required for those with Alzheimer’s are different from that of the general assisted living population.

Read, How to Compare Assisted Living Facilities, for more information.

Memory Care Centers

Dedicated Memory Care Centers are the best way to ensure patients live in supportive, stimulating and caring environments specifically designed and dedicated to those with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

In addition to exemplary, round-the-clock care, high-quality memory care centers have on-site doctors, nurses, dental care, pharmacies, etc., to ease the transition for residents who are ill or require routine, managed care for existing medical conditions.

Similarly, things like Town Center models, art and music facilities, classes and other amenities provide a sense of “normal life” and make it a pleasure for spouses, friends and family members to visit.

Ultimately, memory care centers adhere to the Alzheimer Association Dementia Care Practice Recommendations, focused on tenets like person-centered care, on-site medical staff and supportive and therapeutic environments. All are proven to improve the quality of life for those with Alzheimer’s and dementia.

Alzheimer’s Care And Support in Atlanta

Challenging conditions of an aging brain should be met with a supportive well-rounded community carefully planned for the individual.

This not only includes access to all of the necessary resources for a high quality of life today but one that can adapt to who they are tomorrow.

Learn more about memory care in Atlanta

Here is an additional list of resources is designed to answer your questions, provide tips and help your family throughout the process of finding the right Memory Care.

The Alzheimer’s Association

The Alzheimer’s Association Georgia Chapter

Caregiver Advice on Managing Symptoms and Handling Situations

Dementia and Alzheimer’s Caregiver Center, from the Alzheimer’s Association

A Place for Mom, How to Recognize Signs It May Be Time for Assisted Living

Oak Tree Family Medicine  

Emory Johns Creek Hospital 

Autrey Mill Nature Preserve and Heritage Center 

Southeastern Railway Museum

Georgia Aquarium

Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area

Suggested Reading

Creating Moments of Joy, by Joy-Jolene, A Brackey, 1999

Activity Planning at Your Fingertips by Marge Knoth

Failure Free Activities for the Alzheimer’s Patient, by Carmel Sheridan

Activity Planning for Persons with Dementia: A sourcebook available through the Alzheimer’s Association

Wandering: Common Problems with the Elderly Confused by Graham Stokes

Please check back often as we continually add to our resource list.

Have a question that isn’t answered here?  Feel free to contact us.

Can You Spot Someone With Alzheimer’s?

When you think of someone living with Alzheimer’s or dementia do you picture them looking a certain way?

Perhaps you think of an older person who is confused, repeating the same questions over and over or wearing mis-matched clothes.  While someone with Alzheimer’s may exhibit these behaviors at some point, the disease affects people in different ways, and it can strike people in their 50’s or even earlier.  Assuming everyone living in cognitive decline will look or act a certain way simply isn’t true and can perpetuate stigma and fear often surrounding Alzheimer’s.

Learning more about the disease and how it impacts the brain can give you a better understanding of what it is like to live in cognitive decline or potentially spot early warning signs.

Alzheimer’s Can Progress Slowly

alz care midlothian va
Don’t assume everyone with Alzheimer’s looks the same.

Alzheimer’s and dementia are progressive. Barring a sudden injury to the brain, such as massive stroke for example, someone doesn’t just wake up one day with multiple symptoms of the disease.  It progresses slowly and can go unrecognized for years. Research suggests by the time most people show noticeable signs of dementia, the disease has been present and causing damage to their brain for many years.

The first sign is usually memory loss which can easily be passed off as normal forgetfulness.  However, as the disease progresses many people in the early stages know something is wrong, which can be very scary.  It isn’t uncommon for someone to try and hide symptoms or explain them away as a senior moment.

So yes, it is very possible for mom, dad or Uncle Joe to live with the disease for a long time without family or friends knowing or observing behaviors often associated with Alzheimer’s.

People Suffering From Alzheimer’s Can Look Like You

Cynthia Guzman had been diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s.  She didn’t deny or hide the disease but did recognize there were times she had trouble understanding or needed someone to slow down and explain something again.

In a touching article she details her experience during a trip to the ER for a respiratory health issue.  As she went over her health history with medical staff she was told by many providers – but you don’t look like you have Alzheimer’s.  In her article she notes:

The fact that even health professionals – who should know more about this disease process than the average person – were surprised by seeing someone with Alzheimer’s who is vibrant, energetic and articulate speaks volumes.

Learn More About Early Warning Signs

It is important to recognize the early signs of Alzheimer’s in yourself or your family members so you can talk to your doctor as early as possible. If diagnosed and treated early a doctor may be able to prescribe medications to help slow the disease’s effects. Download your copy of the top 10 warning signs from alz.com or read more about recognizing the signs so you can stay educated.


About The Memory Centers

memory care va beach
Town Center, Virginia Beach

The Memory Center communities in Midlothian/Richmond, Virginia Beach and Johns Creek provide dedicated care for those living with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.  Our Virginia Beach location was founded as the first assisted living facility devoted specifically to memory care.  Our unique design and programs meet the challenging conditions of an aging brain with a caring, interactive community.

Utilizing the latest in science, nutrition and interactive therapies, our daily structured activities provide meaningful purpose to those with memory loss.

All Memory Center communities are built around our original Town Center and Neighborhood layout and feature focused programming and daily activities available across all levels of dementia.  We get to know each resident for who they are today – not who they used to be.get in touch

What To Do When You Get An Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

Getting an official diagnosis that memory lapses are the result of Alzheimer’s or dementia is life-altering. If you or your loved one still function “normally” in day-to-day life, it can be tempting to go into denial and pretend as if everything’s just fine until there are more obvious or alarming signs that compromise the quality of life.

The truth is, however, that fast-action is the key to creating both short- and long-term care plans. There is still no cure for Alzheimer’s, and it is considered a progressive disease. The rate at which it progresses varies for each person, but it can happen more rapidly than expected, and this places the person with Alzheimer’s, his/her spouse, and loved ones in a crisis state.

Taking Timely, Methodical Actions After An Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

The more you learn about Alzheimer’s, and Alzheimer’s resources in your area, the faster you’ll be able to establish a personalized plan of action.

The goal is to give the person with Alzheimer’s ability to make some decisions for him/herself whenever possible. This becomes challenging – and then impossible – as the condition progresses because transitions are detrimental if you wait too long.

Learn about the disease and current treatment options

Hopefully, your medical team, including the neurologist, have provided you with lots of information about Alzheimer’s, all together it’s progression, and the known medications, lifestyle changes and treatment options that support a patient’s wellbeing.

Other helpful resources for learning about Alzheimer’s include:

Don’t hesitate to call or email your primary physician to schedule a follow-up appointment, so you can ask questions and listen to the answers you may not have been able to take in during the immediate consultation after the Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

Start the conversation regarding memory care options

Memory care will play a role at some point, and the quality of this care – and its ability to improve the quality of life for your loved one – is 100% related to how soon s/he transitions into the right community. This will probably require multiple conversations as you weigh the pros and cons of various options, and tour facilities and communities.

While the idea of staying home is preferred by many, caregiving for a middle- to late-stage Alzheimer’s patient is a full-time job. 

Unfortunately, contrary to the original plan, many spouses or close family members realize too late that they aren’t capable of providing the level of care required, 24/7. That results in a very traumatic transition into memory care, assisted living or nursing home care – and it may mean having to give up your first-choice if they don’t have space when you finally make a decision.

Tour your options as soon as you can

It’s helpful for prospective residents to tour memory care options themselves so they have some autonomy in the decision. However, we understand that this can be scary and nerve-wracking for many – and that some simply refuse to do it all together.

If your loved one is resistant to touring options with you, we recommend inviting a close family member or friend to accompany and support you. You might find starting the process solo – bringing back information and ideas – will motivate your spouse or loved one to accompany you the next time.

Read,Questions to Ask When Touring Memory Care Facilities, so you get the information and details you need to make a good decision.

Start to plan for the financial side of things

Memory care is an expense – whether you’re hiring full-time caregivers in your home or you transition into a memory care center. Unless your financial plan already accommodated for extended, long-term care of some kind – you’ll need to start preparing your finances.

Read,Affording Alzheimer’s Care, for some helpful ideas and tips for funding high-quality memory care.

There are situations where Medicare and Medicaid can subsidize expenses, but they rarely pay for the entirety of the costs associated with memory care. After establishing memory care options in your area, their administration and staff will help you review the realm of financial and payment choices available to you.

Keep your loved one as engaged and active as possible

Studies show over and over again that early action in terms of diet, lifestyle habits, social engagement, and mental stimulation are all key to slowing down and decreasing the progression of Alzheimer’s and dementia.

Often, the shock or embarrassment of an Alzheimer’s diagnosis, combined with the complications associated with fading memory and social situations, leads to social isolation. This is a worst-case scenario because mental and social stimulation keeps those neural pathways open and firing.

Try to find daily activities, outings, and social settings that inspire feelings of connections, safety, and security for your loved one. This could also include taking advantage of adult day care options at a prospective memory care center as part of the transition into becoming a resident.

Establish your support network

Being a spouse, partner, or primary caregiver for someone with Alzheimer’s is a challenging job. You are going to need a range of support to help along the way.

Ideas include:

It takes a village to care for both those with Alzheimer’s as well as their spouses, family members, and loved ones. Establishing your support network while you have the time and space to do so allows you to activate support options as needed down the road.

Handling A Loved One’s Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

Remember: there is never a need to go it alone. 

After an Alzheimer’s diagnosis, enlist the support of family and friends to help you move forward – step-by-step.

Learn more about your loved one’s Alzheimer’s diagnosis and find support in these articles: 

LATEST NEWS


10
Sep

What To Do When You Get An Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

Getting an official diagnosis that memory lapses are the result of Alzheimer’s or dementia is life-altering. If you or your loved one still function “normally” in day-to-day life, it can...

READ MORE

18
Jan

17 Questions to Ask Memory Care Facilities When Touring

Sometimes you have to turn the tables, shift your perspective and look at things from a different angle in order to find the right answer. This is certainly the case...

READ MORE

15
Oct

The Latest Alzheimer’s Facts, Figures & Stats [2020]

Medicine’s understanding of Alzheimer’s, and its effects on the human brain, is still in the pioneering phases. While we learn more all the time about how genetics, life events, and...

READ MORE

GET MEMORY CARE NEWS & TIPS


Sign up for e-mail updates, news and tips from The Memory Center.

News & Tips
Sending

GET IN TOUCH


We want to hear from you. Feel free to ask a question or request more information about The Memory Center and our communities.

The Memory Center - Atlanta

Top