Virginia Beach Alzheimer’s Support Group

THE MEMORY CENTER VIRGINIA BEACH IS HOSTING A VIRTUAL ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP STARTING MONDAY JUNE 1ST FROM 4:15PM-5:00PM AND THE 1ST MONDAY OF EACH MONTH THEREAFTER.

PLEASE JOIN JOAN MOTLEY AND BRENDA COBB OF INTERIM HOME HEALTH AND HOSPICE AS THEY PRESENT AN ARRAY OF INFORMATION ABOUT THIS DISEASE.

IT WILL BE A WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITY TO SPEAK WITH OTHER CAREGIVERS WHO ARE EITHER TAKING CARE OF A LOVED ONE WITH ALZHEIMER’S/DEMENTIA, ANYONE WHO WOULD LIKE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS DISEASE OR EVEN FAMILIES WHO ARE WONDERING ABOUT THEIR OPTIONS FOR CARE OF THEIR LOVED ONE.

Please RSVP to Roberta Gilbert, Admissions/Marketing Director at: Roberta@thememorycenter.com

NOTE:  This is a virtual event, once you RSVP you will receive more information about how to log in. 

Alzheimer’s & Dementia Care Partner Support Group

 

Join Mayme Holombe of Dynamic Hospice for a weekly Dementia and Alzheimer’s Care Support Group.  This group meets the third Thursday of every month at 10am.

Held at The Memory Center Atlanta, the group provides a safe place to learn more about the dementia process and how to manage difficult behaviors and day to day challenges.  Learn and connect with others who are caregivers. Everyone is welcome. 

Please RSVP below or by calling 770-476-3678.

Download a flyer for more information.

 

 

Evening Alzheimer’s and Dementia Support Group

dementia support group atlanta
Download a flyer.

Caring for a loved or family member with Alzheimer’s or dementia can be difficult.  Connecting with others in the same situation can be beneficial to learn from each other, get questions answered and find out about new resources.

The Memory Center, Atlanta is pleased to announce a new Alzheimer’s and Dementia Partner Support group coordinated by Certified Facilitator – Carol Mullen with Compassus.

This group will meet at The Memory Center, Atlanta the first Wednesday of every month from 6pm-7pm.

Everyone is welcome, and there is no charge for the event.  To reserve your spot call (678) 607-9679 or email Christine Miller at ChristineM@thememorycenter.com

Upcoming groups are scheduled:

Wednesday, September 6th at 6:00pm

Wednesday, October 4th at 6:00pm

Wednesday, November 1st at 6:00pm

The Memory Center, Atlanta is located in Johns Creek next to City Hall and Emory Hospital at 12050 Findley Road.

Alzheimer’s Support Group at The Memory Center, Richmond

alzheimer's support group midlothian va
Click for more information.

The Memory Center, Richmond is pleased to work with the Greater Richmond Alzheimer’s Association to host an Alzheimer’s and Dementia Family Caregiver Support Group.

Caring for a loved one with memory loss is difficult and many feel like no one understands what they are going through, or they just need someone to talk to who will understand.

Meetings will take place the second Tuesday of each month from 4:30pm – 6:00pm with light refreshments served.  For those eligible, volunteers are available to care for your loved one. 

While meetings are free and open to the public, if you would like volunteer care for your loved one, please contact the Greater Richmond Alzheimer’s Association at (804) 967-2598 ahead of time to determine eligibility.

Upcoming meetings include:

Tuesday, February 14

Tuesday, March 14

Tuesday, April 11

The Memory Center is located in Midlothian adjacent from St. Francis hospital, just minutes from Route 288 and Powhite Parkway. 

 

 

Richmond Resource Guide For Alzheimer’s Care And Support

Suspecting a loved one has Alzheimer’s is anxiety-inducing, but the official confirmation from a GP or neurologist is life changing.

From that moment on, it’s important to have current, accurate and easy-to-access information about Alzheimer’s, what to expect and the best means of supporting the well-being of both the individual diagnosed, as well as his/her team of caregivers.

While an adjustment period is understandable, we recommend taking action as quickly as you can in order to create a long-term care plan that resonates with current research and findings pertaining to Alzheimer’s care best practices.

Upon getting an Alzheimer’s diagnosis, you have much to explore and consider, including:

  • Diet modifications
  • Lifestyle changes
  • Cognitive therapy
  • Memory care options
  • And more

The sooner you do this, the more involved the patient can be with making decisions that will impact the rest of his/her life.

Locate High-Quality Online Alzheimer’s Resources

There is a myriad of results when you search, “Alzheimer’s Care” or “Alzheimer’s Research,” but not all resources are created equal.

The most accurate and relevant information available online is typically provided via national organizations and well-known non-profits (usually website addresses ending with .org, .gov or .edu).

The more you learn about Alzheimer’s, the better your decision-making process. Also, you are your loved one’s greatest advocate. Well-meaning physicians, nurses, and caregivers do their best, but there’s a chance that something you’ve learned will be essential to improving your loved one’s care and overall outcomes.

Here are some of our favorite, online resources about Alzheimer’s, memory care and the latest research/findings.

The National Institute on Aging’s Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias

The National Institute of Health (NIH) has several sub-entities under its umbrella; one of these is the National Institute on Aging (NIA).

The NIA has an incredibly thorough webpage that covers all manner of age-related diseases and conditions, and their page dedicated to Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias is a great place to begin learning more about Alzheimer’s and the current treatments at your own pace.

Their website has easy-to-read (and share) pages on the basics of Alzheimer’s, as well as the various forms of Alzheimer’s and dementia. This is important because medications, treatments, and care can vary depending on the type of Alzheimer’s or dementia.

For example, while the symptoms of Lewy Body Dementia are similar to Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia, the wrong medications can worsen the patient’s experience and symptoms if it is misdiagnosed and treated using more standard Alzheimer’s treatments.

The Alzheimer’s Association

The Alzheimer’s Association was founded specifically to eliminate Alzheimer’s via high-quality research.

It’s a voluntary organization and, in addition to information about Alzheimer’s as well as the latest research and upcoming trials, the AA also works to connect those affected by Alzheimer’s in the Richmond, VA area with< a href=”https://www.thememorycenter.com/alzheimers-support-group-at-the-memory-center-richmond/”> the support they need.

The AA is a joint venture, including the work of healthcare professionals, caregivers, and family members just like you. To date, the Alzheimer’s Associations has provided support for millions of people nationwide.

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America

One of the most effective resources offered by the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America is their Alzheimer’s Support Hotline (866-232-8484).

This toll-free number is staffed 24/7, by licensed clinical social workers who specialize in Alzheimer’s and dementia-related conditions. Speaking with them can feel like a lifeline, especially for those who are newly navigating the vast array of information out there, or who have yet to confide in family members and friends.

AFA is also non-profit and is dedicated to spreading the word that a proactive approach to Alzheimer’s has a significant effect on slowing down its progression and relieving or diminishing symptoms.

They also provide FREE and confidential memory screenings in Richmond and nationwide.

Alzheimer’s Support From Family & Friends

Often, those who are newly diagnosed with Alzheimer’s – as well as their spouses – decide to hide what they know for the time being.

The problem with this is multi-fold; first, it’s confusing for family and friends who are noticing the same signs and symptoms as you did but without any explanation or further insight.

Secondly, your family and friends are an invaluable resource as you begin to learn more about the disease and when it comes to providing certain aspects of care – as well as respite care.

We recommend reading our Guide for Talking to a Loved One About Memory Care, as it covers important information about the communication and decision-making processes, as well as tips on how to include family and friends.

Research Memory Care Options

As mentioned above, research shows that those with Alzheimer’s and dementia do notably better when provided with dedicated memory care.

In most circumstances, those with Alzheimer’s have the best outlook and highest quality of life when they move to memory care communities sooner, rather than later. This enables individuals time to settle in, feel comfortable, and adjust to their new home while they still have the ability to make decisions for themselves.  

Assisted Living Options

If you’re considering an assisted living facility, make sure they offer a separate wing or sections specializing in memory care so your loved one doesn’t wind up becoming part of their general residential population – the large majority of which have a different set of needs.

Use, How to Compare Assisted Living Facilities, as a guide to better weigh each prospects’ offerings.

Respite Care

Inevitably, the first level of care provided for those with Alzheimer’s takes place in the home via the loving attention of a spouse, family members and/or friends.

However, caregiving is an all-consuming job, and the needs of the patient will quickly deplete the energy levels and well-being of the care providers if they don’t take care of themselves.

Respite care is a must-have resource for anyone who is an immediate caregiver for a spouse or loved one with Alzheimer’s. This service is available via home care aides, adult daycare centers or memory care centers offering drop-in or short-term residential options.

Make respite care a priority from the beginning so you can take care of yourself, observe routine appointments and enjoy well-deserved breaks and traditional family vacations.

Memory Care Centers

It used to be that assisted living or nursing home options were the only resources available when the level of care required moved beyond what was possible at home.

Over the course of the past decade, however, research has shown that dedicated memory care centers – assisted living options wholly tailored to improving outcomes for those with Alzheimer’s and dementia – provide greater quality of life and improved outcomes for both patients and their families.

Furthermore, we’ve learned that transitioning into memory care communities sooner, rather than later, is beneficial for all because it decreases the high-level of stress and the lack of autonomy for the patient that transpires when families wait until they are in crisis.

By moving during the later-beginning or mid-stages of Alzheimer’s, the patient can settle in, learn their way around and create their own sense of community before the disease progresses.

Most memory care centers offer in-house doctors and nurses, licensed staff, pharmacies and innovative resources that minimize the need for off-site appointments that become agitating for residents as their condition progresses.

High-quality memory care centers adhere to Dementia Care Practices and provide ample “normal life” routines via amenities like the town center concept, which markedly improve the residents’ quality of life.

Read, Questions to Ask When Visiting Memory Care Communities, to learn more about what you should be looking for when choosing the right memory care for your loved one.

Alzheimer’s Care And Support in Richmond

An Alzheimer’s diagnosis requires quick action to enable you the time to research and learn about the available care and support options for your loved one.

You’ll soon find that such a progressive disease can be faced head-on, with dignity, given the right resources and support.

Learn more about memory care in Richmond

 

Atlanta Resource Guide For Alzheimer’s Care And Support

An Alzheimer’s or dementia diagnosis is life changing, and it is also a call-to-action.

The sooner you can breathe through the initial shock and adjustment period, the better able you’ll be to create a long-term care plan that involves the input, opinions, and preferences of your loved one.

Quick action also optimizes the time available to research and learn more about the Alzheimer’s journey before it progresses to mid- or later-stages.

This gives you a more spacious ability to explore local options for the following:

  • Adult day care
  • Home care
  • Memory care

It also enables you to thoughtfully develop and assemble a financial plan that supports your loved one’s long-term care goals.

Top Online Resources to Learn About Alzheimer’s and Alzheimer’s Care

There is only so much you can take in at a doctor’s appointment, especially in the wake of a confirmed Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

The odds are that in addition to visiting your general practitioner, you’ll be referred to a neurologist.

Hopefully, your healthcare team will provide plenty of information about Alzheimer’s via pamphlets, and allow ample time for your questions and answers. We recommend recording appointments (with the doctor’s permission), so you can listen back afterward.

There are a wide range of reputable, online resources for learning about Alzheimer’s disease, keeping up on the latest research regarding medications and/or lifestyle changes that slow its progression, as well as information about the type of long-term care that’s most successful for those with mid- to late-stages of Alzheimer’s and dementia.

The following are the most well-respected and current websites available.

The National Institute of Aging Alzheimer’s Page

The US Department of Health and Human Services underwrites an organization called the National Institute of Health (NIH). Under this umbrella also lives the National Institute on Aging (NIA), which hosts an Alzheimer’s Disease page.

This is a solid place to start when you want to learn everything you can about Alzheimer’s, including general descriptions of the disease, information about caregiving needs and options as well as up-to-date facts about current Alzheimer’s research.

Another exciting thing about the NIA’s page is that it provides information about upcoming and existing clinical trials in which consenting adults can participate.

Additionally, there is a wealth of educational resources about diet and lifestyle changes that help to prevent Alzheimer’s, slow down its progression and to improve the outcome for those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

The Alzheimer’s Association

The Alzheimer’s Association is a leading voluntary health association dedicated to supporting Alzheimer’s research, providing information about Alzheimer’s and memory care, and connecting others with Alzheimer’s support in the Atlanta area and online.

The Alzheimer’s Association was founded more than 30 years ago when a group of families and caregivers joined together to create an organization that would unite caregivers, provide support to those facing Alzheimer’s and advance research into the disease.

Today, the AA has connected with and provided support to millions of people affected by an Alzheimer’s diagnosis and their website continues to be a premier resource for all aspects of Alzheimer’s information.

Alzheimer’s Foundation of America

Similar to the Alzheimer’s Association, the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) was founded by individuals who are personally affected by Alzheimer’s.

One of their most helpful resources is a national toll-free hotline, (866-232-8484), that is staffed entirely by licensed clinical social workers specializing in Alzheimer’s care, treatment and support.

Like other non-profits, the AFA funds research and does everything possible to provide caregiver support and educate the public about Alzheimer’s, including information about confidential memory screening services available in Atlanta and elsewhere. Memory screenings are funded by generous donors and grantors and have been used to screen more than four million people nationwide.

Alzheimer’s Support From Family & Friends

An Alzheimer’s diagnosis spreads ripples far beyond the lives of the patient, most powerfully impacting their spouse, immediate family and the next ring of family members and close friends.

Having conversations with these individuals early establishes your first rungs of support. Often, individuals are reticent to share this information and may want to keep it a secret out of fear, feelings of embarrassment and shame, etc.

While a short period of private adjustment is understandable, the sooner you feel comfortable having deep conversations with family and close friends, the better you’ll navigate a long-term care plan that makes sense for you and loved ones.

Read, Guide for Talking to a Loved One About Memory Care, which also outlines how to bring close friends and family into the conversation.

Learn About Memory Care Options

One of the first items of business is creating a memory care plan; again, this is one of the reasons early action is so critical.

While it’s true people with early stages of Alzheimer’s can do fine for a bit by implementing in-home caregiving support, it’s also true that caregiving becomes quickly overwhelming for spouse caregivers. Thus, it makes sense to learn all you can about the full spectrum of options to add to your Alzheimer’s support and care kit.

In almost all cases, those with Alzheimer’s fare best when they move to memory care communities earlier, rather than later, so individuals have time to feel at home and adjust to their new environment while they are still able to make decisions and be more fully present in their day-to-day lives.

Once mid- to late-stage Alzheimer’s sets in, significant transitions are highly stressful for both patient and spouse. And, sadly, in the attempt to “preserve the status-quo” for as long as possible, the resulting stress and strain of the move can exacerbate their symptoms.

Respite Care

In the beginning, while your loved one lives at home, you’ll need respite care. This invaluable service provides a break for primary caregivers.

While respite care can be brought in, or offered by a local senior center, we recommend using respite care options offered by the assisted living or memory care centers you’re currently researching. It’s an opportunity to familiarize yourself with their grounds, services, programs, and staff and ask important questions to learn more about the community.

Assisted Living Options

Until recently, those with later-stage Alzheimer’s moved into assisted living and/or nursing home facilities. These are still options, but we recommend only considering facilities offering dedicated memory care services since the needs and care required for those with Alzheimer’s are different from that of the general assisted living population.

Read, How to Compare Assisted Living Facilities, for more information.

Memory Care Centers

Dedicated Memory Care Centers are the best way to ensure patients live in supportive, stimulating and caring environments specifically designed and dedicated to those with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

In addition to exemplary, round-the-clock care, high-quality memory care centers have on-site doctors, nurses, dental care, pharmacies, etc., to ease the transition for residents who are ill or require routine, managed care for existing medical conditions.

Similarly, things like Town Center models, art and music facilities, classes and other amenities provide a sense of “normal life” and make it a pleasure for spouses, friends and family members to visit.

Ultimately, memory care centers adhere to the Alzheimer Association Dementia Care Practice Recommendations, focused on tenets like person-centered care, on-site medical staff and supportive and therapeutic environments. All are proven to improve the quality of life for those with Alzheimer’s and dementia.

Alzheimer’s Care And Support in Atlanta

Challenging conditions of an aging brain should be met with a supportive well-rounded community carefully planned for the individual.

This not only includes access to all of the necessary resources for a high quality of life today but one that can adapt to who they are tomorrow.

Learn more about memory care in Atlanta

Atlanta Resource Guide for Alzheimer’s Care & Support

An Alzheimer’s or dementia diagnosis is life changing, and it is also a call-to-action.

The sooner you can breathe through the initial shock and adjustment period, the better able you’ll be to create a long-term care plan that involves the input, opinions, and preferences of your loved one.

Quick action also optimizes the time available to research and learn more about the Alzheimer’s journey before it progresses to mid- or later-stages.

This gives you a more spacious ability to explore local options for the following:

  • Adult day care
  • Home care
  • Memory care

It also enables you to thoughtfully develop and assemble a financial plan that supports your loved one’s long-term care goals.

Top Online Resources to Learn About Alzheimer’s and Alzheimer’s Care

There is only so much you can take in at a doctor’s appointment, especially in the wake of a confirmed Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

The odds are that in addition to visiting your general practitioner, you’ll be referred to a neurologist.

Hopefully, your healthcare team will provide plenty of information about Alzheimer’s via pamphlets, and allow ample time for your questions and answers. We recommend recording appointments (with the doctor’s permission), so you can listen back afterward.

There are a wide range of reputable, online resources for learning about Alzheimer’s disease, keeping up on the latest research regarding medications and/or lifestyle changes that slow its progression, as well as information about the type of long-term care that’s most successful for those with mid- to late-stages of Alzheimer’s and dementia.

The following are the most well-respected and current websites available.

The National Institute of Aging Alzheimer’s Page

The US Department of Health and Human Services underwrites an organization called the National Institute of Health (NIH). Under this umbrella also lives the National Institute on Aging (NIA), which hosts an Alzheimer’s Disease page.

This is a solid place to start when you want to learn everything you can about Alzheimer’s, including general descriptions of the disease, information about caregiving needs and options as well as up-to-date facts about current Alzheimer’s research.

Another exciting thing about the NIA’s page is that it provides information about upcoming and existing clinical trials in which consenting adults can participate.

Additionally, there is a wealth of educational resources about diet and lifestyle changes that help to prevent Alzheimer’s, slow down its progression and to improve the outcome for those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

The Alzheimer’s Association

The Alzheimer’s Association is a leading voluntary health association dedicated to supporting Alzheimer’s research, providing information about Alzheimer’s and memory care, and connecting others with Alzheimer’s support in the Atlanta area and online.

The Alzheimer’s Association was founded more than 30 years ago when a group of families and caregivers joined together to create an organization that would unite caregivers, provide support to those facing Alzheimer’s and advance research into the disease.

Today, the AA has connected with and provided support to millions of people affected by an Alzheimer’s diagnosis and their website continues to be a premier resource for all aspects of Alzheimer’s information.

Alzheimer’s Foundation of America

Similar to the Alzheimer’s Association, the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) was founded by individuals who are personally affected by Alzheimer’s.

One of their most helpful resources is a national toll-free hotline, (866-232-8484), that is staffed entirely by licensed clinical social workers specializing in Alzheimer’s care, treatment and support.

Like other non-profits, the AFA funds research and does everything possible to provide caregiver support and educate the public about Alzheimer’s, including information about confidential memory screening services available in Atlanta and elsewhere. Memory screenings are funded by generous donors and grantors and have been used to screen more than four million people nationwide.

Alzheimer’s Support From Family & Friends

An Alzheimer’s diagnosis spreads ripples far beyond the lives of the patient, most powerfully impacting their spouse, immediate family and the next ring of family members and close friends.

Having conversations with these individuals early establishes your first rungs of support. Often, individuals are reticent to share this information and may want to keep it a secret out of fear, feelings of embarrassment and shame, etc.

While a short period of private adjustment is understandable, the sooner you feel comfortable having deep conversations with family and close friends, the better you’ll navigate a long-term care plan that makes sense for you and loved ones.

Read, Guide for Talking to a Loved One About Memory Care, which also outlines how to bring close friends and family into the conversation.

Learn About Memory Care Options

One of the first items of business is creating a memory care plan; again, this is one of the reasons early action is so critical.

While it’s true people with early stages of Alzheimer’s can do fine for a bit by implementing in-home caregiving support, it’s also true that caregiving becomes quickly overwhelming for spouse caregivers. Thus, it makes sense to learn all you can about the full spectrum of options to add to your Alzheimer’s support and care kit.

In almost all cases, those with Alzheimer’s fare best when they move to memory care communities earlier, rather than later, so individuals have time to feel at home and adjust to their new environment while they are still able to make decisions and be more fully present in their day-to-day lives.

Once mid- to late-stage Alzheimer’s sets in, significant transitions are highly stressful for both patient and spouse. And, sadly, in the attempt to “preserve the status-quo” for as long as possible, the resulting stress and strain of the move can exacerbate their symptoms.

Respite Care

In the beginning, while your loved one lives at home, you’ll need respite care. This invaluable service provides a break for primary caregivers.

While respite care can be brought in, or offered by a local senior center, we recommend using respite care options offered by the assisted living or memory care centers you’re currently researching. It’s an opportunity to familiarize yourself with their grounds, services, programs, and staff and ask important questions to learn more about the community.

Assisted Living Options

Until recently, those with later-stage Alzheimer’s moved into assisted living and/or nursing home facilities. These are still options, but we recommend only considering facilities offering dedicated memory care services since the needs and care required for those with Alzheimer’s are different from that of the general assisted living population.

Read, How to Compare Assisted Living Facilities, for more information.

Memory Care Centers

Dedicated Memory Care Centers are the best way to ensure patients live in supportive, stimulating and caring environments specifically designed and dedicated to those with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

In addition to exemplary, round-the-clock care, high-quality memory care centers have on-site doctors, nurses, dental care, pharmacies, etc., to ease the transition for residents who are ill or require routine, managed care for existing medical conditions.

Similarly, things like Town Center models, art and music facilities, classes and other amenities provide a sense of “normal life” and make it a pleasure for spouses, friends and family members to visit.

Ultimately, memory care centers adhere to the Alzheimer Association Dementia Care Practice Recommendations, focused on tenets like person-centered care, on-site medical staff and supportive and therapeutic environments. All are proven to improve the quality of life for those with Alzheimer’s and dementia.

Alzheimer’s Care And Support in Atlanta

Challenging conditions of an aging brain should be met with a supportive well-rounded community carefully planned for the individual.

This not only includes access to all of the necessary resources for a high quality of life today but one that can adapt to who they are tomorrow.

Learn more about memory care in Atlanta

Here is an additional list of resources is designed to answer your questions, provide tips and help your family throughout the process of finding the right Memory Care.

The Alzheimer’s Association

The Alzheimer’s Association Georgia Chapter

Caregiver Advice on Managing Symptoms and Handling Situations

Dementia and Alzheimer’s Caregiver Center, from the Alzheimer’s Association

A Place for Mom, How to Recognize Signs It May Be Time for Assisted Living

Oak Tree Family Medicine  

Emory Johns Creek Hospital 

Autrey Mill Nature Preserve and Heritage Center 

Southeastern Railway Museum

Georgia Aquarium

Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area

Suggested Reading

Creating Moments of Joy, by Joy-Jolene, A Brackey, 1999

Activity Planning at Your Fingertips by Marge Knoth

Failure Free Activities for the Alzheimer’s Patient, by Carmel Sheridan

Activity Planning for Persons with Dementia: A sourcebook available through the Alzheimer’s Association

Wandering: Common Problems with the Elderly Confused by Graham Stokes

Please check back often as we continually add to our resource list.

Have a question that isn’t answered here?  Feel free to contact us.

Richmond Resource Guide For Alzheimer’s Care And Support

Suspecting a loved one has Alzheimer’s is anxiety-inducing, but the official confirmation from a GP or neurologist is life changing.

From that moment on, it’s important to have current, accurate and easy-to-access information about Alzheimer’s, what to expect and the best means of supporting the well-being of both the individual diagnosed, as well as his/her team of caregivers.

While an adjustment period is understandable, we recommend taking action as quickly as you can in order to create a long-term care plan that resonates with current research and findings pertaining to Alzheimer’s care best practices.

Upon getting an Alzheimer’s diagnosis, you have much to explore and consider, including:

  • Diet modifications
  • Lifestyle changes
  • Cognitive therapy
  • Memory care options
  • And more

The sooner you do this, the more involved the patient can be with making decisions that will impact the rest of his/her life.

Locate High-Quality Online Alzheimer’s Resources

There is a myriad of results when you search, “Alzheimer’s Care” or “Alzheimer’s Research,” but not all resources are created equal.

The most accurate and relevant information available online is typically provided via national organizations and well-known non-profits (usually website addresses ending with .org, .gov or .edu).

The more you learn about Alzheimer’s, the better your decision-making process. Also, you are your loved one’s greatest advocate. Well-meaning physicians, nurses, and caregivers do their best, but there’s a chance that something you’ve learned will be essential to improving your loved one’s care and overall outcomes.

Here are some of our favorite, online resources about Alzheimer’s, memory care and the latest research/findings.

The National Institute on Aging’s Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias

The National Institute of Health (NIH) has several sub-entities under its umbrella; one of these is the National Institute on Aging (NIA).

The NIA has an incredibly thorough webpage that covers all manner of age-related diseases and conditions, and their page dedicated to Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias is a great place to begin learning more about Alzheimer’s and the current treatments at your own pace.

Their website has easy-to-read (and share) pages on the basics of Alzheimer’s, as well as the various forms of Alzheimer’s and dementia. This is important because medications, treatments, and care can vary depending on the type of Alzheimer’s or dementia.

For example, while the symptoms of Lewy Body Dementia are similar to Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia, the wrong medications can worsen the patient’s experience and symptoms if it is misdiagnosed and treated using more standard Alzheimer’s treatments.

The Alzheimer’s Association

The Alzheimer’s Association was founded specifically to eliminate Alzheimer’s via high-quality research.

It’s a voluntary organization and, in addition to information about Alzheimer’s as well as the latest research and upcoming trials, the AA also works to connect those affected by Alzheimer’s in the Richmond, VA area with< a href=”https://www.thememorycenter.com/alzheimers-support-group-at-the-memory-center-richmond/”> the support they need.

The AA is a joint venture, including the work of healthcare professionals, caregivers, and family members just like you. To date, the Alzheimer’s Associations has provided support for millions of people nationwide.

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America

One of the most effective resources offered by the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America is their Alzheimer’s Support Hotline (866-232-8484).

This toll-free number is staffed 24/7, by licensed clinical social workers who specialize in Alzheimer’s and dementia-related conditions. Speaking with them can feel like a lifeline, especially for those who are newly navigating the vast array of information out there, or who have yet to confide in family members and friends.

AFA is also non-profit and is dedicated to spreading the word that a proactive approach to Alzheimer’s has a significant effect on slowing down its progression and relieving or diminishing symptoms.

They also provide FREE and confidential memory screenings in Richmond and nationwide.

Alzheimer’s Support From Family & Friends

Often, those who are newly diagnosed with Alzheimer’s – as well as their spouses – decide to hide what they know for the time being.

The problem with this is multi-fold; first, it’s confusing for family and friends who are noticing the same signs and symptoms as you did but without any explanation or further insight.

Secondly, your family and friends are an invaluable resource as you begin to learn more about the disease and when it comes to providing certain aspects of care – as well as respite care.

We recommend reading our Guide for Talking to a Loved One About Memory Care, as it covers important information about the communication and decision-making processes, as well as tips on how to include family and friends.

Research Memory Care Options

As mentioned above, research shows that those with Alzheimer’s and dementia do notably better when provided with dedicated memory care.

In most circumstances, those with Alzheimer’s have the best outlook and highest quality of life when they move to memory care communities sooner, rather than later. This enables individuals time to settle in, feel comfortable, and adjust to their new home while they still have the ability to make decisions for themselves.  

Assisted Living Options

If you’re considering an assisted living facility, make sure they offer a separate wing or sections specializing in memory care so your loved one doesn’t wind up becoming part of their general residential population – the large majority of which have a different set of needs.

Use, How to Compare Assisted Living Facilities, as a guide to better weigh each prospects’ offerings.

Respite Care

Inevitably, the first level of care provided for those with Alzheimer’s takes place in the home via the loving attention of a spouse, family members and/or friends.

However, caregiving is an all-consuming job, and the needs of the patient will quickly deplete the energy levels and well-being of the care providers if they don’t take care of themselves.

Respite care is a must-have resource for anyone who is an immediate caregiver for a spouse or loved one with Alzheimer’s. This service is available via home care aides, adult daycare centers or memory care centers offering drop-in or short-term residential options.

Make respite care a priority from the beginning so you can take care of yourself, observe routine appointments and enjoy well-deserved breaks and traditional family vacations.

Memory Care Centers

It used to be that assisted living or nursing home options were the only resources available when the level of care required moved beyond what was possible at home.

Over the course of the past decade, however, research has shown that dedicated memory care centers – assisted living options wholly tailored to improving outcomes for those with Alzheimer’s and dementia – provide greater quality of life and improved outcomes for both patients and their families.

Furthermore, we’ve learned that transitioning into memory care communities sooner, rather than later, is beneficial for all because it decreases the high-level of stress and the lack of autonomy for the patient that transpires when families wait until they are in crisis.

By moving during the later-beginning or mid-stages of Alzheimer’s, the patient can settle in, learn their way around and create their own sense of community before the disease progresses.

Most memory care centers offer in-house doctors and nurses, licensed staff, pharmacies and innovative resources that minimize the need for off-site appointments that become agitating for residents as their condition progresses.

High-quality memory care centers adhere to Dementia Care Practices and provide ample “normal life” routines via amenities like the town center concept, which markedly improve the residents’ quality of life.

Read, Questions to Ask When Visiting Memory Care Communities, to learn more about what you should be looking for when choosing the right memory care for your loved one.

Alzheimer’s Care And Support in Richmond

An Alzheimer’s diagnosis requires quick action to enable you the time to research and learn about the available care and support options for your loved one.

You’ll soon find that such a progressive disease can be faced head-on, with dignity, given the right resources and support.

Learn more about memory care in Richmond

Below is our additional list of resources designed to answer your questions, provide tips and help your family throughout the process of finding the right Memory Care.

Online Resources

The Alzheimer’s Association

A Place for Mom, How to Recognize Signs It May Be Time for Assisted Living

Bon Secours St. Frances Medical Center

Caregiver Advice on Managing Symptoms and Handling Situations

Dementia and Alzheimer’s Caregiver Center, from the Alzheimer’s Association

Department of Veteran’s Affairs

Family Caregiver Alliance

National Institute on Aging

Alzheimer’s Navigator

Suggested Reading

Stages & Behaviors of Alzheimer’s

Inside The Brain of Alzheimer’s – An Interactive Tour

Creating Moments of Joy, by Joy-Jolene, A Brackey, 1999

Activity Planning at Your Fingertips by Marge Knoth

Failure Free Activities for the Alzheimer’s Patient, by Carmel Sheridan

Activity Planning for Persons with Dementia: A sourcebook available through the Alzheimer’s Association

Wandering: Common Problems with the Elderly Confused by Graham Stokes

Taking over Your Aging Parent’s Finances, by Barry Bridges (The Simple Dollar)

Planning for Easter with Alzheimer’s By David A. Pride

Please check back often as we continually add to our resource list.

The Latest Alzheimer’s Facts, Figures & Stats [2020]

Medicine’s understanding of Alzheimer’s, and its effects on the human brain, is still in the pioneering phases. While we learn more all the time about how genetics, life events, and lifestyle components are involved in catalyzing the initial signs and progression of Alzheimer’s, the cure remains elusive.

With respect to the ever-emerging science pertaining to the causes, treatments, and potential for Alzheimer’s disease, we update our Alzheimer’s Disease Fact Sheet regularly to reflect the current research.

Accurate Facts, Figures, & Stats Improve Alzheimer’s Quality of Life

The more you remain up to date on the current research and studies’ findings, including Alzheimer’s facts, figures, and stats, the better you can improve the quality of life for yourself and the ones you love.

First, we’ll begin with some basic, bullet-point facts about Alzheimer’s disease (AD), followed by more detailed information to support the care and support provided for those with AD. The following facts are derived from two helpful AD resources: The NIH’s page on Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Alzinfo.org.

Visit our Resource Guide for Alzheimer’s Care & Support for more helpful AD websites.

  • AD is the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States
  • Most people with late-onset AD exhibit signs and symptoms as early as their 60s, even if the diagnosis doesn’t happen until much later (more on that below).
  • Experts believe that AD-related changes in the brain may actually start as much as ten years before the beginning symptoms are detectable.
  • Early-onset AD comprises about 10% of the Alzheimer’s population and is typically noticed/diagnosed between the ages of 30 and 60.
  • Someone is diagnosed with AD about every 65 seconds.
  • Doctors predict as many as 14 million Americans will be living with Alzheimer’s by the year 2050.
  • One-third of all seniors die with Alzheimer’s or some other dementia-related condition
  • It costs about 350K per person to support the long-term health and wellbeing of an AD patient (read, Is Medicare/Medicaid an Option… for information about financing the care you need).
  • There are multiple forms of AD and dementia – early-onset, late-onset, Lewy Body, Parkinson’s-related, etc. Care and treatment plans may vary depending on the type.
  • Alzheimer’s genes (and other biomarkers) are identified, but they are not the sole cause of AD, nor does the presence of the genes mean an individual will get AD. 
  • There is no specific treatment for AD or dementia, although some drug treatment protocols slow its progression.
  • Certain lifestyle changes have been shown to slow down the progression of AD.

Those last two points are part of what makes living with Alzheimer’s so challenging. There are not always clear reasons why a person has the disease, and there is no tried-and-true treatment for AD at this time.

This is why ongoing research around Alzheimer’s potential causes and treatment methods is so important. The more we learn about the brain and how it is affected by Alzheimer’s-related proteins, amyloid plaques, and tau tangles, the closer we get to a potential cure. 

Early Diagnosis is Key

Because Alzheimer’s is often diagnosed at the beginning of the middle-stage, when cognitive impairment is too dramatic to ignore, patients, families, and caregivers miss the opportunity to make decisions before things are chaotic and stressful. By diagnosing AD in the early stages, you have time to:

  • Learn all you can and make a long-term AD care plan that involves the individuals’ wishes, desires, and goals
  • Make smart decisions about caregivers or facilities
  • Tour memory care centers
  • Implement diet and lifestyle changes that reduce inflammation and support a healthier mind and body.

Read What to Do About an Alzheimer’s Diagnosis to learn more about the first, critical items to consider in the wake of an official diagnosis.

Re-Evaluate Diet & Make Anti-inflammatory Shifts

Recent studies have shown that high-fat, high-sugar diets “prime the brain” for AD. Diets that are higher in fats, sugars, and processed foods contribute to inflammation in both the hippocampus and the frontal lobe of the brain, two areas that experience AD decline. 

Patients who have AD and who maintain their high-fat/sugar diets tend to progress more rapidly through the disease’s stages and have lower life expectancies. Making the switch to an inflammatory diet is a powerful one. The Fischer Center for Alzheimer’s Research writes, “Older men and women who ate a Mediterranean-style diet showed less shrinkage of the brain than their peers who did not eat foods typical of the Mediterranean region.”

Click here to read more about anti-inflammatory, Alzheimer’s-oriented diet recommendations.

Establish a Healthy Circadian Rhythm

You may have heard about sundowner’s syndrome, or you may have personal experience with it if you’re currently an AD caregiver. The more we learn about the body’s need for natural daylight and dark to maintain essential biochemical balance in the brain, the more there is a need to establish a healthy circadian rhythm in the home.

Alz.org’s page on Sleep Issues & Sundowning offers tips for how to establish healthy daily and nighttime rhythms to prevent these issues and support brain health. When you begin looking for long-term care options, make sure to ask about how they help to prevent and support sundowning for their residents.

Social Engagement & Activities Are Essential

The NIH states in addition to healthy diet and lifestyle practices, “… social engagement, and mentally stimulating pursuits…might also help reduce the risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease.” 

If your loved one tends to retreat into depressed, anxious, or embarrassed seclusion, get in touch with Alzheimer’s support groups in your area, and learn how to keep AD patients socially stimulated and engaged to boost morale and their quality of life. 

Your busy calendar doesn’t have to be put on hold. Contact Adult Day Care or Respite Care options in your area to keep your loved one safe and ensure s/he remains social, participating in activities s/he enjoys to promote overall well being.

Click the links below for more helpful information on memory care and supporting your loved one through their Alzheimer’s diagnosis. 

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